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antique textiles

” A pair of stockings one of them with the needles in it…”

Currently working on my new book – a sort of horrible histories for people who like textile history. And I found this source, a book about the extant records of a York pawn shop. I haven’t yet been to see the primary source, but have been working on some very similar, previously unpublished sources, I […]

Categories
antique textiles craft activism Knitting political knitting

“Knitting Isn’t Political”?

Anyone in the fibre arts world would have to have been living under a rock, in the past week, to have missed the delicious controversy, involving a certain orange buffoon, here: https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/not-for-trump-fans-hat   Reading through the comments, one point made by the pattern’s detractors, really got my interest. Knitting isn’t political. Yes, right. Textiles have […]

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antique textiles inkle weaving Textile Arts viking crafts

Inklings

The administration of Robert Watson’s estate  (Shopkeeper. Selby, Yorkshire). Sept 10, 1689 Inventory Nov 8th, 1688 Goods in the Shopp 5 doz of stockins att 7s, £1-15-; one doz ditto 13s; 3 doz of childrens stockins att 2s 6; 120 yards of blew linn, 8-17-8,…. 8 pr. of worstet stockings att 2s 6d., £1; 5 […]

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antique textiles Huddersfield

“With His Head All Dyed A Brilliant Magenta Colour”

Well, I finally got round to making a tiny Etsy shop, to sell our mudags and some of my naturally dyed fibres: https://hemingwayandhunt.etsy.com So now the mudags will be available to folk who can’t get to wool shows in Yorkshire, this year! And also, talking of dyeing, one of my (possible) Dawson relatives found this […]

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antique textiles

Nalbinding Crash Course

Nalbinding It started like this. Every year, I meant to get on the Nalbinding For Beginners workshop, run by the York Archaeological Society at the VikingFest.  Every year, it sold out before I could get on it.  But, I noticed a few years back, the course for Advanced Nalbinders didn’t sell out.  So, a few […]

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antique textiles

Historical Knitting to Float Your Boat

In the shops now, ‘The Knitter’ 121, with a piece I wrote recently, about the history of knitting as reflected in marine archaeology. I went in search of knitting from shipwrecks.  And found some great history, from the ‘Mary Rose’ to the more recent, and spectacular, Palmwood finds in the Netherlands. Via, of course, the […]

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antique textiles convicts Knitting York

“Some Knitted Nightcaps of the Debtors”

1821 Thursday, 18th October [York] Went over the bridge at 11 ¼. Went shopping with my aunt… Walked with my aunt around the castle yard (she wanted some knitted nightcaps of the debtors)…” [Anne Lister’s Diary, p. 175 ‘The Secret Diaries of Miss Anne Lister” (Virago, ed. Helena Whitbread)].   Reading Anne Lister’s diaries was […]

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antique textiles great wheel Uncategorized

THE YORKSHIRE MUDAG

Mudags, aka:  muirlags, Crealagh and craidhleag (creels) were egg-shaped baskets with a ‘post hole’, used for holding wool ready to spin. They are known to have been a thing in Scotland – and so, hopefully, Ireland, Wales and England too. You placed your mudag close to the fire, for the wool’s lanolin to melt a […]

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antique textiles dales knitting Hand spinning Uncategorized

Walking Wheel – How Many Miles A Month?

So how many miles could a Great Wheel spinner walk in a month? 120 miles? To reprise; in “Spinning Wheels, Spinners and Spinning”, Patricia Baines wrote: …It is said that spinners who worked in the textile industry in Yorkshire and Lancashire walked the equivalent of 30 miles a week spinning wool…   [Baines,  Batsford 1977 Edition, […]

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antique textiles Knitting

Boring But Useful – Knitting Needle Size Conversion Chart

Just finally got round to making one of these. And I thought it might be useful for other fans of vintage haberdashery and knitters of old patterns.  Many charts available only go down in size to the more useful needle sizes for contemporary knitting – ie: around 3.25mm. Yet many Victorian patterns call for 1mm […]